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Feb 15 deadline for Scholarship to Write Historical Fiction with Me

There is one week to apply for a scholarship to come to a workshop in beautiful Mendocino and write historical fiction with me!  Lots of other great scholarships, too.  Don't miss that deadline! 

 

Find all of the scholarship information here

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Book Club Discussion Questions: Spider in a Tree

Questions for Discussion
SPIDER IN A TREE    
 
1.    How are the Jonathan, Leah, Sarah, Saul, Joseph, Elisha and others  in the novel like you and others you know? In what ways are they different?
 
2.    What do you think the fact that this is a novel – a work of fiction--  brings to this history? What does it make possible? What does it leave you wanting more of?  What do you make of the fact that many (but not all) of the characters in the book are based on people who really did live in 18th century New England? 


3.    Do you like the character Jonathan Edwards as a person?  How about Leah? 


4.    Do you find it surprising that the household of Jonathan, an 18th century Calvinist preacher and theologian, included enslaved people?  


5.    What role does religion play in the life of Jonathan Edward? In the life of Leah?  Saul? How does Sarah express her faith? What does it mean to Elisha? 


6.    Have you ever been to any of the places in the book?  New England? Northampton? If you have, how did your experiences in those places relate to them as portrayed in the book?  What do you think the landscape offers or means to Jonathan Edwards? To Leah? Other characters? 


7.    Why do you think the residents of Northampton made the decision to expel the Edwards family? 
8.      Did you come to the book already knowing about Jonathan Edwards and his theology? If yes, what have your experiences with it been?  How did those experiences affect the ways you read the novel? If not, how did you experience it?


9.    Susan Stinson:  "We all bring different perspectives, experiences, emotions, analyses and histories to this discussion, and perhaps different senses of what is sacred. I think that is all of the more reason to examine these stories of deeply-held religious belief as human stories.  I'm not a historian or a theologian. I'm a novelist. I believe that the engagement, empathy and insight we bring to history is shaped by the engagement, empathy and insight with which we approach the telling of stories."

 

Do that sound like a useful approach to history to you?  Can you think of a time from your own life when telling a story was helpful in a tense or complicated moment or subject matter?


10. Did you look at the (small print!) notes on research at the back of the book?  Why or why not? 


11. On pp 115-118, there are quotes from Jonathan Edwards's most famous sermon, "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God." On p. 304, there is a quote from his treatise, "The Nature of True Virtue."  Do you respond to more strongly to one of these writings from Jonathan Edwards than the other? What do you make of the differences between them? 


12. Do any of the situations or moral dilemmas in the book have implications for current times?  If so, what are they? 

 
13. If you could travel back in time and speak to one of the characters of the book, who would you choose? What would you say?
 

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American Antiquarian Artist Fellowships

The deadline to apply to do research for a novel, play, poetry, visual art, dance, or other creative work at the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, MA is coming up on October 5, 2018.  American Antiquarian Society Artist Fellowships are fantastic.  I had one a couple years ago in support of the historical novel I am working on now, and couldn't believe the depth of their holdings and the generous support of their staff.  It was like having a brilliant, helpful research staff and access to incredible holdings.  There is a stipend and a housing option as well, complete with a room set up to be accessible for people with mobility disabilities, which is where I stayed. 

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Writing at Amherst College and Forbes Library, Write/Angles, PACE art show

Here are some the things I've got coming up:

I'm teaching Fiction Writing 1 at Amherst College in Fall 2017. That is utterly exciting. I love the work of trying to help young writers develop their craft to sustain the work that they are most excited about doing.

I'm also speaking to the wonderful Global Valley Course at Amherst College. The students read my novel, Spider in a Tree as part of a fantastic survey of the history of the Connecticut River Valley.

If you're not an Amherst College student, you can writing with me at the Writing Room on Saturday mornings, 9:30-12:30 in the Watson Room on the mezzanine of Forbes Library, which is the public library in Northampton. It's mostly silent writing, with check-ins at the beginning and at 11:45.

I'll be on a panel about writing historical fiction at the Write/Angles Conference , Sunday, November 18 at Mt. Holyoke conference. All are welcome to register.

Finally, in Colorado, I'm excited to have an excerpt from my novel Venus of Chalk being shown alongside a painting by my brother Don Stinson at Draft , at the Parker PACE Arts Center in Parker, Colorado. The ekphrastic show, which puts the work of writers and visual artists in conversation with each other, will be on display in the PACE Center Art Gallery from September 1 to October 31.

Please do check out these events, and there's still time to apply for my Fiction Writing I class if you're an Amherst College Student.
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